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Innovative Advocacy for Our Clients.

Suretyship

Our lawyers are some of the most experienced surety attorneys in the nation. With a total of more than 80 years of combined suretyship representation, they offer a full range of services to the industry. The Firm represents most of the premier sureties in the country and has engaged in international representation when requested. The services provided range from simple advice on payment and performance bond claims to complex financing, takeover and tender problems on large projects. We regularly assist our surety clients with pursuit of their indemnity rights and pride ourselves on useful, efficient and practical advice in these situations.

Frequently, our representation of sureties requires litigation of technical construction issues.  Our attorneys have developed considerable expertise with such matters that allows us to effectively advocate and resolve disputes.

 

 

 

 

 

Recent News

Florida Supreme Court Declines to Adopt Florida Legislature’s Daubert Amendment
For many years Florida followed the Frye standard for the admissibility of expert testimony based upon new or novel scientific evidence.  See Frye v. United States, 293 F. 1013 (D.C. Cir. 1923).   In 2013, the Florida Legislature, through what has been dubbed the Daubert Amendment, replaced the Frye standard with the Daubert standard.  The Daubert standard stems from the United States Supreme Court’s decision in Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharms., Inc., 509 U.S. 579 (1993), which established the federal court standard for expert testimony.  Since then, federal courts have continued to apply the Daubert standard, and 36 states have adopted the Daubert standard.

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October 21, 2013
Motor Vehicle Dealer Bonds: Florida's Fourth District Court of Appeal Punts on Attorneys' Fees Issue

Florida’s Fourth District Court of Appeal recently had the opportunity to provide much needed guidance on the issue of whether a statutory motor vehicle dealer bond caps the surety’s liability for plaintiff’s attorneys’ fees at the penal sum of the bond.  Unfortunately, the court found another issue to be dispositive and declined to rule on the attorneys’ fees issue. 

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October 21, 2013